Keeping Pace with K-12 Online Learning: An Annual Review of Policy and Practice

This eighth edition of Keeping Pace—digital education’s
yearbook cum encyclopedia—offers
promising statistics for online-learning proponents: All fifty states
and D.C.
now offer at least some sort of online or blended learning opportunity,
with
digital course enrollment jumping 19 percent in the last year alone.
Good news.
But there’s more. At an average per-pupil expense of about $7,000,
full-time online
learning can cost thousands less than the average brick-and-mortar
experience.
Other trends are interesting. Notably, single-district programs have
grown the
fastest this past year—with consortia programs greatly expanding as
well. (Implementation
of the Common Core standards will likely spur states to adopt this
consortium
model as well, say the authors.) Yet other trends serve as reminders
that we
have yet to unlock the full potential of online learning: Digital
programs are
serving a disproportionately low percentage of minorities, free and
reduced-price lunch students, English language learners, and students
with disabilities.
For those looking to winkle out digital-learning statistics, get a lay
of the
digital-learning landscape, or see how their own states fare in this
realm, Keeping Pace won’t disappoint.

Click to play

Click to listen to commentary on Keeping Pace from the Education Gadfly Show Podcast.

 

John Watson, Amy Murin, Lauren Vashaw, et al., Keeping
Pace with K-12 Online Learning: An Annual Review of Policy and Practice

(Durango, CO: Evergreen Education Group, 2011).

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